FFCRA Poster and Frequently Asked Questions

FFCRA Poster and Frequently Asked Questions

The Department of Labor (DOL) has issued the attached poster that covered employers have to post in their workplaces. The poster advises employees of their rights under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) to paid leave and expanded benefits under the Family Medical Leave Act. See the frequently asked questions (FAQs) issued by the DOL, which provide some guidance regarding basic issues with respect to the notice posting and dissemination of information contained in the poster.

The notice should be posted in a conspicuous place, such as where the Metal Trades Department posts all of its labor and employment posters for its employees.

The FAQs are as follows:

Q: Where do I post this notice? Since most of my workforce is teleworking, where do I electronically “post” this notice?

A. Each covered employer must post a notice of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) requirements in a conspicuous place on its premises. An employer may satisfy this requirement by emailing or direct mailing this notice to employees, or posting this notice on an employee information internal or external website.

Q. Do I have to post this notice in other languages that my employees speak? Where can I get the notice in other languages?

A. You are not required to post this notice in multiple languages, but the Department of Labor (Department) is working to translate it into other languages.

Q. Do I have to share this notice with recently laid-off individuals?

A. No, the FFCRA requirements explained on this notice apply only to current employees.

Q. Do I have to share this notice with new job applicants?

A. No, the FFRCA requirements apply only to current employees. Employers are under no obligation to provide the notice of those requirements to prospective employees.

Q. Do I have to give notice of the FFCRA requirements to new hires?

A. Yes, if you hire a job applicant, you must convey this notice to them, either by email, direct mail, or by posting this notice on the premises or on an employee information internal or external website.

Q. If my state provides greater protections than the FFCRA, do I still have to post this notice?

A. Yes, all covered employers must post this notice regardless of whether their state requires greater protections. The employer must comply with both federal and state law.

Q. I am a small business owner. Do I have to post this notice?

A. Yes. All employers covered by the paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave provisions of the FFCRA (i.e., certain public sector employers and private sector employers with fewer than 500 employees) are required to post this notice.

Q. How do I know if I have the most up-to-date notice? Will there be updates to this notice in the future?

A, The most recent version of this notice was issued on March 25, 2020. Check the Wage and Hour Division’s website or sign up for Key News Alerts to ensure that you remain current with all notice requirements: www.dol.gov/agencies/whd.

Q. Our employees must report to our main office headquarters each morning and then go off to work at our different worksite locations. Do we have to post this notice at all of our different worksite locations?

A. The notice needs to be displayed in a conspicuous place where employees can see it. If they are able to see it at the main office, it is not necessary to display the notice at your different worksite locations.

Q. I am running out of wall space. Can I put the required notices in a binder that I put on the wall?

A. No, you cannot put federal notices in a binder. Generally, employers must display federal notices in a conspicuous place where they are easily visible to all employees—the intended audience.

Q. We have break rooms on each floor in our building. Do I have to post notices in each break room on each floor or can I just post them in the lunchroom?

A. If all of your employees regularly visit the lunchroom, then you can post all required notices there. If not, then you can post the notices in the break rooms on each floor or in another location where they can easily be seen by employees on each floor.

Q. Where do I post this notice? Since most of my workforce is teleworking, where do I electronically “post” this notice?

A. Each covered employer must post a notice of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) requirements in a conspicuous place on its premises. An employer may satisfy this requirement by emailing or direct mailing this notice to employees, or posting this notice on an employee information internal or external website.

Q. Do I have to post this notice in other languages that my employees speak? Where can I get the notice in other languages?

A. You are not required to post this notice in multiple languages, but the Department of Labor (Department) is working to translate it into other languages.

Q. Do I have to share this notice with recently laid-off individuals?

A. No, the FFCRA requirements explained on this notice apply only to current employees.

Q. Do I have to share this notice with new job applicants?

A. No, the FFRCA requirements apply only to current employees. Employers are under no obligation to provide the notice of those requirements to prospective employees.

Q. Do I have to give notice of the FFCRA requirements to new hires?

A. Yes, if you hire a job applicant, you must convey this notice to them, either by email, direct mail, or by posting this notice on the premises or on an employee information internal or external website.

Q. If my state provides greater protections than the FFCRA, do I still have to post this notice?

A. Yes, all covered employers must post this notice regardless of whether their state requires greater protections. The employer must comply with both federal and state law.

Q. I am a small business owner. Do I have to post this notice?

A. Yes. All employers covered by the paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave provisions of the FFCRA (i.e., certain public sector employers and private sector employers with fewer than 500 employees) are required to post this notice.

Q. How do I know if I have the most up-to-date notice? Will there be updates to this notice in the future?

A. The most recent version of this notice was issued on March 25, 2020. Check the Wage and Hour Division’s website or sign up for Key News Alerts to ensure that you remain current with all notice requirements: www.dol.gov/agencies/whd.

Q. Our employees must report to our main office headquarters each morning and then go off to work at our different worksite locations. Do we have to post this notice at all of our different worksite locations?

A. The notice needs to be displayed in a conspicuous place where employees can see it. If they are able to see it at the main office, it is not necessary to display the notice at your different worksite locations.

Q. I am running out of wall space. Can I put the required notices in a binder that I put on the wall?

A. No, you cannot put federal notices in a binder. Generally, employers must display federal notices in a conspicuous place where they are easily visible to all employees—the intended audience.

Q. We have break rooms on each floor in our building. Do I have to post notices in each break room on each floor or can I just post them in the lunchroom?

A. If all of your employees regularly visit the lunchroom, then you can post all required notices there. If not, then you can post the notices in the break rooms on each floor or in another location where they can easily be seen by employees on each floor.

https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/pandemic/ffcra-poster-questions

Summary of the Provisions of the Family First Coronavirus Response Act

Summary of the Provisions of the Family First Coronavirus Response Act

Memo issued by President Hart on the Family First Coronavirus Response Act. This memorandum summarizes the provisions of the Response Act that are most salient to labor unions and group health plans. Specifically, this memorandum will focus on the Response Act’s provisions concerning: (1) emergency paid sick leave; (2) emergency family and medical leave; (3) unemployment insurance benefits; (4) health care provisions as they relate to employer-provided health coverage; and (5) employer tax credits for emergency family and medical leave
and emergency paid sick leave.

MTD President Hart Urges Senate to Pass Families First Coronavirus Response Act (H.R. 6201)

In a letter to all Senators on March 16, MTD President James Hart urged them to act swiftly to pass the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (H.R. 6201).

Hart wrote, “While this package is not a complete response to the crisis, it is an urgent measure that will get necessary assistance to working people facing serious health and financial risks.”

H.R. 6201 will encourage working people to seek testing for infection by making the tests free for most people covered by employment-based insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid. We believe this is a crucial step to contain the spread of the virus.”

Read the text of the full letter here.

The Department urges you to contact your Senator today and tell them to pass HR 6201.

The Metal Trades Department, AFL-CIO Supports the Democrats Coronavirus Relief Package

The Metal Trades Department, AFL-CIO Supports the Democrats Coronavirus Relief Package

Washington, DC—The Metal Trades Department, AFL-CIO is urging the House, Senate and White House to pull together in developing policies that will help ensure that America’s hourly and salaried workers will not have to choose between their health and making ends meet.

About 78 percent of workers live paycheck-to-paycheck and nearly 80 million American workers are hourly employees who only get paid for the hours they work. As this virus spreads rapidly across the country, working families will suffer the consequences of inaction by our elected officials.

House Democrats released their coronavirus economic relief bill late Wednesday night, just as layoffs related to the Coronavirus outbreak were being reported. Their emergency economic plan is the first government response that actually addresses the needs of working families.

The Democratic bill includes coverage for coronavirus testing, paid sick leave, and expanded unemployment benefits for those laid off due to the virus’ effects on the economy. Additionally, the bill calls for expanding food assistance and state and local economic assistance.

The Metal Trades Department, AFL-CIO supports this plan as it seeks to provide assistance to those who will be most affected by this pandemic.

# # #

The Metal Trades Department is a trade department of the AFL-CIO. It was chartered in 1908 to coordinate negotiating, organizing and legislative efforts of affiliated metalworking and related crafts and trade unions. Seventeen national and international unions are affiliated with the MTD today. More than 100,000 workers in private industry and federal establishments work under contracts negotiated by MTD Councils. Workers retain membership in their own trade unions.

Message from President Hart on COVID-19

Message from President Hart on COVID-19

Metal Trades Representatives are engaging with employers to ensure that they are providing bargaining unit members with comprehensive safety and prevention measures to defend against being afflicted from the COVD-19 Coronavirus.

Please urge all council and bargaining unit members to protect themselves by practicing common sense precautions, such as washing hands, staying at home when ill and listening to federal and local health authorities. If any Metal Trade’s worker has been exposed to COVID-19 or are experiencing symptoms, please contact the department immediately.

Attached in this communication are two guides that you may use to educate and advise bargaining unit members in their effort to combat against the possible contamination and effects of the global pandemic now facing our nation.

If you have any questions regarding this communication, please feel free to contact me at your convenience.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

James Hart, President

Guidance from the AFL-CIO —CORONAVIRUS: COVID-19 Be Vigilant. Be Prepared. Don’t Panic.

A new coronavirus, COVID-19, originating in Wuhan, China, has spread rapidly across the globe. While there is currently no evidence of widespread transmission in the United States, federal health officials have said that spread of the virus within the country is likely and we should prepare for severe disruptions to everyday life, raising a number of concerns for working people.

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS?

The COVID-19 virus is spreading from person to person, and there is now community transmission in the United States. It is still unclear if the virus lives on surfaces. There is evidence of transmission when people do not have symptoms, and there is some evidence to indicate that the virus is spread more easily than the flu. Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough, runny nose and shortness of breath—similar to flu symptoms. The virus can be fatal, with a higher risk of severe disease or death among older people, individuals with an underlying illness and those left unprotected.
Information on the outbreak is constantly evolving. See the links at the bottom of this page for the most up-to-date information.

WORKERS AT INCREASED RISK

Working people are at increased risk if they frequently interact with potentially infected or infected individuals. Workers who are at increased risk include:

  • Health care workers;
  • Emergency responders (e.g., law enforcement, firefighters, EMTs);
  • Airline operations (e.g., pilots, flight attendants, other airport workers);
  • Other transportation operations;
  • Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and Transportation Security Administration (TSA) workers;
  • Correctional workers;
  • Educators;
  • Cleaning workers;
  • Workers who have been identified as “essential personnel” by their employers during an outbreak or quarantine; and
  • Other workers with broad exposure to the public.

PRIORITIES FOR WORKERS AND UNIONS

  • Comprehensive workplace plans to identify potential exposure routes, controls to mitigate risk and training procedures.
  • Protections for different groups of workers, following the Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines.
  • Policies to encourage sick workers to stay at home without the loss of pay, benefits, seniority or other benefits.
  • Economic policies for unemployment scenarios, where people are not able to be at work or are required to work overtime to take care of patients.
  • Emphasis on personal hygiene practices, hand-washing and respiratory etiquette.
  • Adequate supplies of personal protective equipment, especially N95 respirators, and respirator fit testing.
  • Protocols to clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Protocols in case of a workplace or community outbreak, including possible self-quarantine or workplace quarantine.
  • Plans for supply shortages, triage, prioritization and other contingencies.
  • Consult the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) before hosting and attending events or large gatherings. CDC recommendations may change as the situation evolves.

WHAT WE’RE DOING

  • Working to increase federal funding for agencies involved in fighting the virus.
  • Bringing a worker perspective to Congress as it considers responses to the virus.
  • Stay tuned to the AFL-CIO webpage below for the latest developments.

MORE INFORMATION

Download Guidance Packet

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